TC United Club Soccer
Moving to Competitive Soccer

How do I know when my child is ready to move to competitive soccer

Soccer Interest
The player has a high interest level in soccer and practices on his or her own or with friends.
Signs of Boredom in Recreational Soccer
The players is the best or one of the best on his or her team, and starts to seem bored with the recreational competition level.
Imitation
The player sees higher level players and wants to be like them. They begin to try skills exhibited by high level players.
Maturity
The player is mature enough to commit to more frequent practices and more strenuous training.
Competitive
The player is highly competitive, and enjoys the challenge of competition.
Development
The player has reached the highest possible level of development in a recreational environment, and wants to continue to improve.

Moving to Competitive Soccer Parents Guide

Patience
The rule of thumb is, let your child guide you. Don’t push him or her into trying out for a comp team just because you want it. Some players are ready at age 7 and some aren’t ready to move up until age 13 or 14.
Discussing Tryouts
Talk to your child and gauge his or her feelings about tryouts. There is always a risk that the player won’t make the team; is the response, “If I don’t make the team, I’ll quit” or is it, “I like to play soccer so I’ll find another team if I don’t make it”? Find out what your child’s commitment level is.

The child should also understand that it's he or she alone who is trying out. Their friend may not make the team. In addition, sometimes a whole team or a significant part of a team wants to move up together. Some players may not be ready but do so anyways because their friends are doing it. They would not have tried out for the comp team otherwise. Sometimes this situation results in an unproductive and frustrating experience for the players, parents and coaches.

The Competitive Soccer Environment
This is the highest level of in-state league play. Tryouts are held to determine players and teams. There is no minimum playing time. Players at this level often choose soccer as their only sport and may participate in year-round soccer training and programs. Most comp players were among the best players on their recreational teams. However, they may find that they are merely in the middle on their competitive team. Players must have a high level of commitment to their teams and training. They must practice on their own and spend time watching pro and college games, in order to supplement their development. As with most things there will be a period of adjustment, it is important to remind the player that in order to improve, mistakes must be made. TC United's club coaches put players in environments and situations to help make them a better soccer player. This may mean that a player that typically played a forward in recreational soccer, might be asked to play as a defender. TC United's primary goal for club soccer is and always will be player development.